Kids army joins Greenpeace protest

Kids army joins Greenpeace protestGreenpeace has drafted in a small army of kids to bolster its fight against Lego’s $116m partnership with Shell, by getting the youngsters to build three giant Lego Arctic animals outside Shell’s HQ in London.
Along with their parents and guardians, they called on Lego to stop promoting Shell’s logo on its toys as part of a long-running campaign against the two-year deal signed in 2012.
Last month, Greenpeace released a video for the campaign, “Lego: everything is NOT awesome”, which reached 3 million views in three days before YouTube suspended the video after a complaint from Warner Brothers. Later that day the complaint on YouTube was lifted and the video went back up online. It’s now had over 5 million views on YouTube, despite Lego’s justification that the deal “puts more of its bricks in the hands of more children”.
Today, the children constructed a polar bear, walrus and snowy owl reaching up to seven feet high, outside Shell’s HQ, near Waterloo Station. The giant bricks are made from reinforced cardboard and will be donated to a local school after Lego ends its deal with Shell.
Nearly 700,000 people have already signed a petition calling on Lego to end its deal with Shell; just a month ago the figure stood at 240,000.
Greenpeace Arctic campaigner Elena Polisano said: “Lego’s endorsement of Shell is incredibly damaging because it helps Shell hide its role in the threat to the Arctic. Lego is trusted by parents and kids around the world so if Lego says Shell is OK, people believe it. But Shell is responsible for huge climate-wreaking carbon impacts and now it’s determined to drill in the Arctic. It’s a fragile environment and an oil spill would be devastating. And of course the only reason Shell can even reach the oil is because global warming is melting the ice.
“Children are leading this playful protest because global warming, and what’s happening in the Arctic, is an enormous threat facing all children. Lego is adored by kids, and it has a responsibility to look out for them. It’s unethical for Lego to partner with any company that’s threatening kids’ future.”

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